Ryan Hughes technique

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Duke
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Ryan Hughes technique

Post by Duke » 10:35 am Jun 20 2009

In the July edition of Dirt Bike there is an intriguing article by Ryan Hughes wherein he offers an approach to riding that contradicts much of what is considered common practice. Basically, he has deciphered the riding style of such luminary riders as Bubba Stewart, RC, Ricky Dietrich and world champ Everts, and found that by keeping their butts back, back straight, head and shoulders over the handle bars and taking on a pigeon toed stance as you grip the bike, you are able to achieve control of the bike with the legs and hips exclusively. I tried it, and though I had to be conscious of what I was doing, the ability to traverse thick sand was effortless. I could expound on the writing, but would accidently omit a vital part, rendering the tactic less then successful. Get the magazine and see for yourself and try it.

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Post by island220 » 04:03 pm Jun 20 2009

I read that article and have been trying his tips its working for me but years ago a friend from California preached that same style and none of the people I rode with could even come close to riding as fast as him, we called him crazy Don rode a Bultaco Pursang :prayer:

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Post by Duke » 07:52 pm Jun 20 2009

Whats ironic is that Hughes' approach bares a strong resemblence to what was once preached by **** Burleson in a series of training tapes offered through Thumper Racing many years ago..

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Post by OLHILLBILLY » 06:53 pm Jun 25 2009

I read that article too, good stuff. I've only had a chance for a short ride since but will be working on his pointers. I already ride slightly like he says so I just need to put some thought and attention into refining the technique.
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Post by L8 Apex » 08:33 pm Jun 26 2009

>|<>QBB<
Duke wrote:Whats ironic is that Hughes' approach bares a strong resemblence to what was once preached by **** Burleson in a series of training tapes offered through Thumper Racing many years ago..
There's a picture of DB riding back in the day in his tip article and he is riding just like Ryno preaches. I always liked DB, but that was because he rode Green. :partyman:

Never knew his involvement in Moose Racing, but have already looked into their products because of him.
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Post by Duke » 10:12 am Jun 27 2009

I always liked DB, but that was because he rode Green. :

Green???? Burleson was always associated with Husqvaran in his winning, dominant years and later KTM when he retired and served as writer to several magazines. I would be interested to see the "tip" you make mention of. Any chance of posting?

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Post by island220 » 02:49 pm Jun 27 2009

Tried to find article on website must be to new to be on there site guess they want you to buy mag.

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Post by L8 Apex » 10:09 am Jun 28 2009

>|<>QBB<
Duke wrote:I always liked DB, but that was because he rode Green. :

Green???? Burleson was always associated with Husqvaran in his winning, dominant years and later KTM when he retired and served as writer to several magazines. I would be interested to see the "tip" you make mention of. Any chance of posting?
Hmm. He's on a KX250 in the pic in the article and I have two old mags where he's on the same bike wearing those same Sally Jesse glasses. I also have an old article where either he talks about making his KX woods ready or the magazine made a KX/DB clone and went through the steps. :?
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Post by Duke » 02:33 pm Jun 28 2009

Hmm. He's on a KX250 in the pic in the article and I have two old mags where he's on the same bike wearing those same Sally Jesse glasses. I also have an old article where either he talks about making his KX woods ready or the magazine made a KX/DB clone and went through the steps. :?[/quote]

Well, he obviously then ventured to the Green side for a while. Are you able to post the article or make comment about what was shared?

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Post by gem » 09:39 am Jul 05 2009

On the trail/single track I have been trying to assume this "unhinged hip" stance and if I am not mistaken it is going to require/increase leg strength as you are in a partial squat. It seems somewhat contradictory to Shane Watts more rigid- stand up -squeeze w/ your knees approach but... in line w/ many folks who say the bike should be able to dance around a little between your legs. I would say the biggest change in this approach would be the elbows lower aspect. We are always told "elbows up"!!!

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Post by Duke » 07:59 am Jul 06 2009

The stance could be a bit more physically taxing then say the Watts approach wherein you stand up. But even while seated, one can still employ what ever merits the Ryno Factor has to offer. I have close to 25 years of engraining the atypical attack position when I ride: A means that certainly offered greater control then the methods advocated in the 70's.
But I like the Ryno approach. Now we have some thing that may work for some, and not others. It isnt new as commented from the observations above, just brought to the masses attention.

The Burleson tape shows how this style works. Burleson could be seen flying through the woods and trails on a stock XR250 (Thumper Racing released the tape, so thats why Burleson is mounted atop an XR) at a pace few could match, even on a faster bike. And in retrospect, his elbows are somewhat down and closer to the body then one find in the atypical attack mode. Man, I wished I had kept track of that tape

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Ryan Hughes technique

Post by xrvic » 06:37 pm Jun 12 2012

Scott Summers used this sitdown style too. I understand Drew Smith of WER also used this style.

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Re: Ryan Hughes technique

Post by Duke » 07:30 am Jun 25 2012

Recently Racer X has been hosting riding tips by prominent folks like Hughes and Gary Bailey. Bailey is now preaching more of a sit down style. Also former Yamaha/Honda rider Jim Gibson, in offering lessons advocates an abandoment of the excessive manipulation of the clutch as promoted by Bailey, et al. He feels simply taking the turn a gear lower is more effieicent and renders faster speed than always slipping the clutch in a higher gear. Those who are taught it, now swear by it. Interesting.

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Re: Ryan Hughes technique

Post by CoronasAndChips » 09:54 am Jun 26 2012

I'm new to off road bikes but I can speak from a snowmobile perspective on the stand up or sit down technique. It all boils down to suspension. I have a 1998 Ski-Doo MXZ 583. When riding the stock suspension (the WHOLE bottom underneath that the track is attached to not just the shocks for those of you not in the know)I used to cringe when I saw a rutted out section on the trail. Constantly standing up heaving a 500lb machine around got tiring. :doh:

I upgraded to a 2002 skid (suspension) and now I just float over those sections up to about 3 1/2 to 4 feet. :boogie: So I guess it just boils down to how much money you can throw at the bike to get a absolutely perfect suspension that soaks up bumps and whoops so there's no need to use you legs as shock absorbers. :drool:



For the low vs. high gear cornering I'm not there yet. For me, going through a four foot tall, 170 degree berm/turn on a single track it's easier to concentrate without having to worry about stalling by feathering the clutch by staying in lower gears. On a flat corner I use higher gear and try to power slide using the clutch because there is less risk off stalling and falling over.

Just my two cents I'm still a squid on dirt. :?
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